Active Transportation

Oct 29 2020 - 10:00am to Oct 30 2020 - 10:45am

Walking, cycling and scootering to school allows students to spend more time outside while staying connected with family and peers in a way that ensures safe physical distancing. By developing sustainable actions to encourage students to walk and cycle more often for their school journey, schools can support lasting changes in physical, mental and social well-being across the whole school community.

Tune in for an informational webinar about a new Active School Travel Pilot Program, delivered by BC Healthy Communities Society (BCHC).

May 20 2020 - 12:00am to Jun 17 2020 - 11:45pm

BCIT

This course provides an introduction to how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy use in the transportation sector. Students will be able to implement the transportation pyramid as a framework for community energy management. Students will be able to develop and implement policies that support active transportation, low carbon vehicles and transportation behavior change. Students will be able to explain how management of corporate fleets can support reductions in community-based transportation emissions.

The B.C. Community Road Safety Toolkit is an easily-accessible and electronically-searchable knowledge source about road safety designs and strategies that local governments can implement to improve road safety outcomes. At the same time, the knowledge in the toolkit is intended for all agencies with a mandate related to road safety.

The Canadian Rural Revitalization Foundation works to improve understanding of issues and opportunities that are of common interest to rural residents across Canada. Their members include rural leaders, rural organizations, development practitioners, government policy makers, researchers, students, and other stakeholders both in Canada and internationally.

Communities across BC are motivated to promote cycling as a mode of transportation. 

The motivations for these changes are multifaceted. At the municipal level, they include the impossibility of managing traffic congestion via increased roadways, green city strategies aimed at reducing air pollution and greenhouse gases, and a recognition that the vitality of cities is better promoted by people who are not enclosed in vehicles, but walking, cycling, and interacting with each other. 

This study examined the association between bicyclists’ injuries and the cycling environment (e.g., route types, intersection types). The study took place in Toronto and Vancouver between May 2008 and November 2009. The participants were adults injured while bicycling and treated at hospital emergency departments. Five hospitals recruited participants, 690 in total.

Summary of results

The B.C. Community Road Safety Toolkit is an easily-accessible and electronically-searchable knowledge source about road safety designs and strategies that local governments can implement to improve road safety outcomes.

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