Resources for Small, Rural and Remote Communities

Now Available: Resources tailored to the rural community context!

This resource portal is a response to the unique opportunities, challenges, and approaches to fostering health and well-being in small, rural and remote communities in BC. The portal offers resources related to PlanH action areas with a rural lens.

To find a general listing of resources visit our Resources section.
Follow community progress on Twitter: twitter.com/@BC_HC, #BCHC_SeedingRural

Dig Deeper

The Rural Context

There are over 110 cities, towns, municipalities and villages in BC and of those, over 75% are small, rural or remote communities of less than 30,000 people.i A healthy community approach takes resources and leadership. This can be challenging in small and remote communities where there are fewer organizations, resources and volunteers to do the work. There is often no organization to lead on new or emerging issues like food security or support for seniors at home, and yet the need is often there.

On the positive side, there are many tools and examples of rural success and innovation. Many of these examples are stories of collaborating across sectors, and all of them illustrate “can do” attitudes and creativity to improve well-being.

ihttp://www.citypopulation.de/Canada-BritishColumbia.html and wiki

Focus Areas

Resources are organized by the same Take Action Areas as the rest of the PlanH site (Healthy Society, Healthy People, Healthy Environment) for ease of searching.

Contribute

If you find the portal useful, or if you are looking for something specific, we would love to hear from you as we continue to develop the resources. Contact us here.

 

DISCUSSION PAPER, by Food Secure Canada

Food is many things to many people. It is a source of nourishment, an expression of identity and culture, a vital economic sector and a critical contributor to the health of our people, our environment and the stewardship of our natural resources. Food is not simply a commodity but a central aspect of our social, cultural, historical and environmental realities. Unfortunately, our current food system also contains many contradictions and persistent challenges related to production, distribution and consumption that need to be addressed. 

While the Intelligent Communities movement is largely focused on urban cities, the example of Mitchel, South Dakota on page 14 suggests rural communities can use information and communications technology to boost in-migration.

- Intelligent Communities Forum 

The District of Squamish has launched the Good Neighbour Guidelines, a collection of regulatory District bylaws, common-sense practices and useful information to support public safety, civic responsibility and community for all Squamish residents. The 28-page booklet includes information on a range of topics from animal control to wildlife attractants and everything in between. 

Provides sample bylaws, tools for stewardship and protection of natural green infrastructure for different sized communities and rural areas.
– The Wetland Stewardship Partnership et al.

A guide to building food security in rural communities. The document opens with definitions and an argument for food security, followed by an outline of core ingredients for any food security program: people, mission, resources and administration. It provides examples of possible projects you may decide to explore, with resources for further guidance. It also considers the public policy context for your work (legislation and regulation). 

– North Kootenay Lake Community Services Society

A toolkit for building sociability through multi-family housing

The way we design multi-family housing can make or break social connections and trust. We’ve gathered evidence from psychology, neuroscience, public health and other fields to identify how design influences sociability in multi-family housing.

Use this visual toolkit to identify evidence-based principles, strategies and actions to boost social connections in multi-family housing.

The Metro Vancouver Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of Transportation and Land Use Activities: Guidebook provides a structured approach for planners and policy-makers to evaluate the potential health-related outcomes of an activity (i.e., a project, plan, or policy) before it has been built or implemented. The Guidebook also provides links to data sources, local and provincial resources, and examples.

The Healthy Built Environment (HBE) Linkages Toolkit,  developed by the PHSA Population and Public Health team in partnership with the Healthy Built Environment (HBE) Alliance,  is the first evidence-based and expert-informed resource that links planning principles to health outcomes.

Offers a framework for considering the interconnected aspects of a healthy community and provides many practical examples of how communities are accomplishing healthy community goals withing a variety of community scales.
– Canadian Institute of Planners

The Promising Practices videos found on the Healthy Rural Communities website were the result of the workshops led by Dr. Wayne Caldwell with partnership from Public Health Ontario.

This study examined rural homelessness dynamics in 22 communities across the provinces and territories.  The aim of  the research was to identify whether and how Housing First can be implemented in a rural context.

- Jeannette Waegemakers Schiff, PhD, Alina Turner, PhD, University of Calgary Faculty of Social Work

This PlanH short video celebrates the accomplishments of Granisle, a small northern BC community that serves as a vivid demonstration of how age-friendly policies improve health and wellness for community members of all ages. Granisle residents and community partners have demonstrated that becoming age-friendly creates a healthy community for all through community engagement, building infrastructure and inclusive programs.  

This guide is intended to help practitioners—engineers, planners, health professionals, economic development officials and others—to improve travel options for residents of small and rural communities. This includes a range of actions that make personal transportation activities more sustainable— encouraging drivers to operate their cars more efficiently, or to leave their cars at home and walk, cycle, take transit or carpool instead.

– Transport Canada

This research explored the extent to which rural areas are and should be engaged with sustainability planning, what that looks like in a rural context and if stakeholders feel a sense of engagement with urban and provincial sustainability goals.  The findings are important for local governments, planners and agriculture activists.

- Fraser Basin Council

The local government, health authority and numerous community partners in Kitimat deliver this award winning campaign for physical activity and health.  The slides include contacts for more information.

- City of Kitimat and Northern Health Authority 

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