Recent News

Local governments in British Columbia are invited to apply for a share of more than $1.7 million to develop programs that get people moving and promote physical activity in their communities.

“Increasing physical activity in communities will help improve the health and well-being of British Columbians,” said Health Minister Terry Lake. “A lack of physical activity has contributed to an increase in chronic diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure, and these grants will support more opportunities for people to become more active.”

Could your community use more resources and support to foster strong social connections, or make a measurable impact on physical activity and increase the health and well-being of your residents? Are you a local government with partnerships with your community and health authority in place? Apply for funding with additional support from one or more of the following opportunities.

The Lancet Countdown: tracking progress on health and climate change is an international, multidisciplinary research collaboration between academic institutions and practitioners across the world. It follows on from the work of the 2015 Lancet Commission, which concluded that the response to climate change could be “the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century”. 

A new fact sheet has been released offering evidence-informed principles to support health equity through interventions in the built environment. This supplement to the Healthy Built Environment Toolkit is based on a scoping review titled Working with local governments to support health equity through the built environment. Download it here.

Neighbourhood Small Grants is Vancouver Foundation’s unique program to help build community and strengthen connections right where people live.

Have a great idea for your community? Find out more, and apply for a small grant.

Read below to find out more about the grants, when applications open, if you are eligible, and how to apply. A link to the application form is at the bottom of this page.

WHAT IS A NEIGHBOURHOOD SMALL GRANT?

On January 17, 2017, Squamish Council endorsed the Squamish Children’s Charter, created by the children of Squamish, outlining their rights as children and citizens. The Children’s Charter is a call to the community and decision‐makers to support the well being and unique needs of children.

Community Vitality measures the strength, activity and inclusiveness of relationships between residents, private sector, public sector and civil society organizations that fosters individual and collective wellbeing. Check out the Smithers Community Vitality Report Card, project background and resources, including an introduction to community vitality indicators, past community discussions and presentations.

A new mental-health digital hub that will make it easier for thousands of British Columbians to find the services and supports closest to them is among various targeted initiatives totalling $140 million over three years under Budget 2017 to support those with mental-health and substance-use challenges. The new resources will focus on prevention and early intervention, housing, enhanced treatment and supports, and better integration and access to services.

PlanH partnered with each health authority on a series of five forums taking place in each region to take stock of: the impacts of collaborative efforts between local governments, health authorities, and other community partners; the key factors that are enabling this success; and how we can grow this impact moving forward.

Find stories, presentations from the events, photo galleries and visual notes at the following links:

This article from the Tamarack Institute explores the idea of community resilience as an ability, a process and an outcome, and examines ways in which communities can become more resilient.

Find it here

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