Community Stories

Explore the map below to view community success stories by region:

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About half of the organic food waste from the industrial, commercial and institutional sectors is edible; a network on the North Shore of Vancouver is working on changing local food systems in order to make use of fresh, edible food before it is thrown away.

Over 500 people in the Clayoquot Sound took the Vital Signs survey thanks to leadership from their community foundation. The result provides a data-driven picture of the region’s health and a tool for decision-making.

The Town of Smithers’ Newcomers Recreation and Healthy Eating Accessibility Project partnered with community leaders to build a program that promotes social inclusion by creating a safe space to understand the local culture and try new things.

With 36 organizations involved in the Chilliwack Healthier Community (CHC) partnership, and the list continuing to grow, this enthusiastic team works to address the most urgent social issues identified by the community. 

child biking

The City of Enderby and the Splatsin Nation engaged in a joint transportation planning process that will benefit generations to come.

Months of preparation had led up to this day, but City of Enderby Assistant Corporate Officer and Planning Assistant Kurt Inglis could not predict what would happen.

Powell River's two-day Walkability Forum helped community members see the linkages between health and the built environment. The Forum is an example of local governments and a health authority working together on implementing a common priority - active transportation.

Overview

L.I.F.E

The L.I.F.E. program serves as an effective mechanism to coordinate and collectively promote affordable and accessible recreation services in all thirteen local governments within the CRD.

The heart of the Social Sustainability Strategy is the people of Burnaby; which is about working with community members to develop a plan that would meet their needs and allow them to achieve a prosperous, higher quality of life.

Marnie Essery, chair of the Intermunicipal Advisory Committee on Disability Issues (IACDI), was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis when she was three-years old. The arthritis limits Marnie’s mobility but it hasn’t impacted her passion for the outdoors. However, Marnie found it extremely difficult to explore the natural terrain of many parks in the Capital Regional District (CRD).

District of North Vancouver Partners with Vancouver Coastal Health to Embed Health Lens in New Official Community Plan

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